Sunday, January 26, 2020

A 1921 Pittsburgh Pirates ... family photo?

While working on our book, Marty and I were able to make contact with some of George Gibson's family. Last summer, one of George's great nieces hosted an event that was attended by George's 90-year-old Granddaughter, and her four daughters, all of whom traveled from various points in the United States, to Southern Ontario. This experience was easily one of the highlights of this whole book experience, to be honest. The day started with a baseball game at London's historic Labatt Park -- that saw George's granddaughter, four great granddaughters, and great niece, lead a sell-out crowd in the singing of Take Me Out to the Ballgame, followed by a small gathering for dinner, drinks, and great conversation.

What was particularly cool about the experience, was how excited they were about the fact that we were writing a book about George, and, quite honestly, how welcoming they were to my wife, and son, who joined in on the festivities. It was fun to get to know all of them, besides the baseball, and of course, to be able to talk baseball as well.

One small detail that shouldn't get lost in all of this, is that George's Granddaughter is also the daughter of former big-leaguer Bill Warwick. Bill's career was brief, but he did play for the 1926 Cardinals -- the winners of the 1926 World Series. I always knew that George's daughters married a ball player, but what occurred to me while talking to some of George's great grand daughters, was this: There can't be very many people in the world who can claim that their grand father and their great grand father played in the major leagues, and won the world series.

That thought has stuck with me ever since. I haven't dug too deep to see how many "multi-generational" world series winners are out there but it has made me want to find an old vintage card of Bill Warwick. I haven't had much luck, and was near giving up, until I accidentally found this (on Amazon):



This is a 1921 M114 Baseball Magazines premium of the 1921 Pittsburgh Pirates. Sitting in the centre of the middle row, looking to his right, is George Gibson. Standing eighth from the left, in the back row, is Bill Warwick. Warwick only played 1 game with Pittsburgh in 1921 (according to baseball-reference.com), so it probably wouldn't be too difficult to narrow down when this photo was taken. He then spent a couple of years in the minor leagues, before re-appearing at the major league level with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1925 and 1926.

Whether or not either man knew at the time this photo was taken that one day they'd be family, I have no idea, but seeing this moment captured in time, having now met their extended families, makes this piece that much cooler to me.

Thanks for reading!

3 comments:

  1. It was pretty cool of his family to let you and your family join in on the festivities... I guess that's the perks of writing about someone who still has living relatives :)

    Did you buy that magazine photo?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, honestly, they were so awesome about welcoming us.

      I haven't bought that magazine photo (yet?). The seller wants $80 for it and another $80 to ship it, which seems a bit steep. There is a type 1 of the photo on eBay as well, but it's $400. I actually prefer the M114 because it includes the players names.

      Delete
  2. This might be why Netmarble determined to make the move quick and buy the corporate earlier than it’s turn out to be too large for an acquisition. There are not any separate change of company management triggers for gaming and gambling companies. As 코인카지노 mentioned in 10.1 Disclosure Requirements, general rules apply and alter of management triggers would come with assets or revenues requirements. Obligations beneath the FTRA apply to casino operators, as well as|in addition to} monetary institutions, electronic monetary enterprise operators and sure mortgage enterprise operators.

    ReplyDelete